Eickhoff prize

Dr.-Ing. Schmidt is awarded for his outstanding dissertation

Technical plasmas are among the things that have a significant influence on the world around us, without many people knowing about it. "You can, for example, process surfaces with plasmas; but they are crucial in the production of modern computer chips, which are built into almost all modern technical devices - from cars to smart phones," explains Frederik Schmidt. "A better understanding of this technology leads to innovations that make our lives easier, network people and shape our future.

© RUB, Marquard

In his dissertation, he investigated how the energy gets into a plasma. The path from the power socket to nanometer-sized semiconductor tracks is being investigated by various specialists and is in part well understood. Frederik Schmidt has brought together two of these specialist areas: the electrical network between the power socket and the plasma on the one hand, and detailed plasma simulations on the other. This makes it possible to investigate the relationship between the two. "For example, I have looked at the paths along which energy flows and how much is lost on its way into the plasma. That is sometimes quite a lot," says the researcher. The results help to make systems and superstructures more efficient and thus more economical and ecological. In addition, he has developed his own electrical network that can be implemented for certain applications with considerably less effort and losses than before. "I was able to show theoretically that this works. Colleagues in France were then able to prove in experiments that it is also practically possible to build something like this," says Schmidt.

adapted from Meike Drießen, RUB